29th Conference of the International Society for the Sociology of Religion
July 23 - 27, 2007 in Leipzig, Germany
 
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4. Leipzigs deviant religious groups

Guided tour in English

Guide: Dr Heinz Mürmel (Lecturer at the Dpt. of Religious Studies, University of Leipzig)

Duration: approximately 1.5 hours

Departure: at 2.30 p.m. (main entrance of the Gewandhaus, Augustus Square)

Return: at 4 p.m. (main station)

Price: 10 € per person

Price includes:

English speaking guide

1.5 hours guided walking tour in the historic city centre of Leipzig

Towards the end of the German Empire Leipzig had become the centre of religious and cultural reform movements which quite often looked for the same clientele. Intellectually respectively religiously orientated by ‘Eastern’ traditions they shaped public discussion to a remarkable extent rousing as well hopes as fears. They had come to Leipzig since this city was both liberal and wealthy promising progress. Leipzig’s reputation as cultural and publishing centre of the German Reich was an additional factor furthering this process. So, to give some examples, the influential “Theosophical Society” moved its German HQ to Leipzig in 1898 (being in close contact with the HQs in Adyar/Madras resp. New York). In 1903, Europe’s first Buddhist community was founded here (in June 1912 the General Secretary of the Mahābodhi-Society, Colombo, the Anagārika Dharmapāla, entitled the Leipzig branch to be Germany’s only legitimate society). The dazzling neo-Persian Mazdaznan movement sent its “ambassador to Europe” to this city in 1907/08 (from Chicago). Nobel prize winner Professor W. Ostwald’s activity as president and inspirator of the „Monist movement“ attracted worldwide attention. In close contact to these movements, Leipzig became a prominent site of reform groups like the vegetarian movement, the cremation movement etc. Visiting places where those groups resp. their members resided one learns something about the social background that is often erroneously described as being one of the upper classes.

For the tour “Leipzig’s deviant religious groups“ please note booking number (4) on booking form.

The excursion should be booked before the 1st of May 2007.

For further information and booking please contact:

Sprachenwelt Lindner

lindner@sprachenwelt.biz

Tel.: 0049-(0)341-2609779

Fax: 0049-(0)341-149 88 77